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Earlier this year, entrepreneur and founder of The School for Startups, Doug Richard, published his Entrepreneurs’ Manifesto – a “declaration of rights” for small businesses.

The manifesto sets out eight demands to a new government, each of which addresses a different key concern for businesses. In the build-up to the 6 May general election, Donut MD Rory MccGwire is offering his thoughts on the issues raised by Doug Richard.

Put simply, Doug Richard has suggested that we should scrap Business Link and move government-funded business support online.

In Part 1 of this blog I summarised the recent history of business support in the UK. I concluded that, after 20 years of heavy expenditure, one precious asset that we have is a brand that most business people recognise. Business Link is “the place to go to access whatever help is available”.

In Part 2, I looked at who ‘the customers’ of business support are, and how they would like to receive help. I concluded that it is a very broad audience and that business novices make up a large proportion of the group. The latest research confirms that they prefer one-to-one help to online help, although I am the first to agree that online business support is extremely cost-effective and is more popular with experienced business people. (The popularity of one-to-one support should not come as a surprise to anyone, as it mirrors the way we behave in the rest of our business lives. When we have a question, we usually approach ‘someone who knows’ for the answer.)

So the question for the final part of this three-part blog then becomes something like ‘How is this offline help best given?’, ‘Who should be doing it?’, and ‘What tools/methods can make these delivery methods more cost-effective?’.

Let’s see; what do we already do that works well? Answer: loads of things.

Take start-ups. In the UK we provide start-up packs, start-up seminars, start-up advisers, telephone helplines, and start-up premises (if there is a vacant premises lying around). Although the quality of business support services vary from place to place and from adviser to adviser (more on that later), the business novices who I meet tend to be pretty grateful for the support they have received and think it really has been useful.

Start-ups need to get their hands on a lot of information very quickly, such as information on how to do basic book-keeping. But a typical question from a start-up is not “How do I sell?” but “How do I sell to Mr Smith at ABC Ltd?”. And the person asking this question is really asking for two things. Firstly, they want some suggestions on which types of approach might work best in that specific situation. And secondly, they want reassurance and encouragement from a fellow human being along the lines of “I know that this is totally outside your comfort zone, but go on, you can do it!”. Let’s face it, starting up a business is a lonely, worrying, risky thing to do, so the emotional side of business support is massively important.

Did you notice how difficult that question was by the way, the one about selling to Mr Smith? Most people would struggle to give a good answer to that question. Which brings me on to my next point.

With the right team, you can work out what the 100 most common questions are from start-ups on the topic of sales, and you can then find 1-5 good alternative answers to each question. You can put these questions and answers on a website, for those people who like to browse businesslink.gov. And you can also put them into a business support knowledge bank, which is exactly what clever East Midlands Development Agency has done, so that anyone in any local business support organisation can use (and contribute to) these questions and answers.

I know this is all possible, because it is what my company does for a living. We find out what all the most common questions are, then provide the answers and keep the whole library up to date each year. Any company with our skill-set could do it.

It is worth noting that the involvement of an outside ‘supplier’ seems to be essential. The Training and Enterprise Councils, Business Links and Regional Development Agencies have never been good at knowledge banks; hundreds of new items of “useful” information simply pile up month after month without being organised, tagged, edited, de-duplicated or later updated.

In the UK we seem to have spent the last 30 years squabbling over budgets and contracts and who does what – and always with a focus on the delivery end of things. It is only since the businesslink.gov website came along that we have started to realise the value of providing excellent tools for those delivery organisations to use.

Look at Tesco. How would they run business support in the UK? They would hire the best of the best to create (and keep up-to-date) a set of integrated ‘products’ that their network could then deliver. They would have three suppliers of each type of product at any one time, to keep the suppliers on their toes (think CRM software, training courses, brokerage system, knowledge bank, CPD, and so on). But they would pay the suppliers properly and they would enable the suppliers to build up capacity and world-class know-how in their niches (rather than stopping to re-tender the contract every five minutes like the public sector does).

Would Tesco keep the regional Business Link offices? They could not say, until they were a lot clearer on their budget and their objectives for the next decade. But we can be sure that they would end up with a slick, branded, easy-to-access service that achieved what the customer wanted. They would use ‘invisible shopper’ market research to improve the service, as this quickly identifies the problems and the opportunities for improvement.

Let me finish on this point of economics. Business support is not just a cost. Every time we help a good company to be brilliant, we boost employment and GDP. And, looking at the other end of the scale, every time we help a long-term unemployed no-hoper to start in self-employment (even if it is just as a gardener or window cleaner), we boost employment and GDP and reduce the welfare burden on the state.

Last year the UK spent £80bn on education. We spent £97bn on welfare. And every year we happily dish out taxpayer-funded training to public sector employees on everything from assertiveness and teambuilding to you-name-it. These are vast sums of money and any spending on business support needs to be judged in comparison with these other budgets and what they achieve for our society.

Just as it makes economic sense to have a workforce that is literate and numerate, it makes sense to have owner managers who know how to start-up, run and grow a business. Personally, I do not think that taxpayer-funded business support needs to be an expensive operation, but it does need to be high quality and accessible, both online and offline.

I look forward to your comments.

Read Doug Richard’s Entrepreneurs’ Manifesto

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You may well be using various social networking sites to promote your new business, but are you exposing yourself (and the company) to identity theft and malware attacks in the process?

In March 2010 my company published results from a survey of over 1,100 members of Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace, Twitter and other popular social networks. It showed an increasing awareness among social network users of how to keep personal information private, BUT it also revealed how they still put their identities and sensitive information at risk. For instance, 28% of respondents never changed their default privacy settings and over 60% published their date of birth (a key piece of information for identity theft).

What can you do?

To help business owners understand and protect themselves while online, here are some tips as a guide for safer social networking:

  • Make personal information private — Protect yourself by updating privacy settings on all your profiles to restrict or omit access to any personal data. Users of popular geo-location services that allow you to share where you are should be especially careful not to disclose your location to the wrong people.
  • Read between the lines — Familiarise yourself with the social networks’ privacy options to ensure you’re taking advantage of any enhanced security features.
  • Think before you click – You and any employees might know not to follow a link in an email message from an unknown source, but if that link appears in a message from a social networking “friend” or in a tweet from someone the employee is following, it might be a different story. A bad link would result in malware being downloaded to your company network.
  • Protect your password — As a critical line of defence, it is more important than ever for you to choose passwords wisely, and make them different from one site to the next. Incorporating numbers, letters and special characters like !, $, and * into your password makes it stronger. Microsoft has a free password checker. If the green bar doesn’t show “Strong,” change the password.

Use a free password generating tool like LastPass if you can’t come up with a good one yourself. I’d also recommend changing your password at regular intervals, and never use the same password at more than one site.

  • Suite security — Protect your PC with an internet security suite that includes antivirus, antispyware and firewall technologies. Remember to schedule updates daily and to scan the whole machine for malware weekly.
  • Always automate software updates — If you’re already using anti-malware software, be sure to install updates which include the latest malware definitions. Do the same with updates to your operating system, web browser and other key applications. However, watch out for fake software updates like emails that purport to be from Microsoft or Adobe which require you click on a link to update your computer. Try using Secunia PSI, a free tool, to double-check that any automatic update is genuine.
  • Check shortened URLs – Especially on Twitter with its 140 character limit, and Facebook, the use of URL shortening has exploded. But these anonymous links can lead to a malicious payload. If you use TweetDeck then set it to display a preview of the shortened link including the full URL , its page title and number of visitors. Also most web browsers offer a plug-in that shows you the long version of the URL when you hover over a shortened link.

Jeff Horne, director of Threat Research at internet security software supplier, Webroot (www.webroot.co.uk)startupdonutbannerbutton728x90

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